Should I Take a Contract Job?

Dear Plume,

I was let go at the start of the Covid shutdown from a job I had for the past eight years. Although they started to recall some of their employees, I’m pretty sure I won’t be one of them.

I’ve been looking at the job boards. There are some positions that seem to be a good fit for me, but the majority of them are only for six months, and most of them are contracts.

I’ve never worked as a contractor before. Should I apply for (and take) a contract job? There’s a lot of them out there, but I feel it’s a step down from being an employee.

I can’t be unemployed much longer, but I dread the idea that I’d have to look for another job in six months. What should I do?

– Unsure

***

Dear Unsure,

I recommend contract work to anyone who has been an employee for a while. It’s a great way to level-up your career!

Downsizing, reorgs, and virtual teams result in a lot of “combined” job descriptions – meaning that the responsibilities listed in the JD were likely accomplished by two or more people. Now, they must be done by one. This is when people are likely to consider someone who could do the job, not just someone who has…

If you’ve been an individual contributor, and think it’s time for you to move into management, or perhaps you want to slide laterally into a space that has more long-term growth, a contract job is the perfect way to do it.

Contract work has a fixed duration because very often contract work is related to a one-time (CapEx) project; there’s a beginning, middle, and end. For example, you hire a carpenter to build a backyard fence. You agree upon a price and anticipated duration, and the carpenter works and bills you according to the terms of your agreement. When the fence is done, the carpenter leaves. Most people don’t need two backyard fences. If you love the fence, and think, “Hey, I need a front fence,” or a neighbor wants a fence, that’s nice. But, for the most part, after the fence is built, the job is done, and the carpenter leaves.

Knowing there is beginning-middle-end allows you to prepare. Employees often have little or no notice of when their job will end.

Depending on the nature of the work, your initial contract can turn into more work or different work (very common). In some cases, the client may wish to hire you (less common, but possible.) If you decide you want to continue working for the client (and you may not), and the client has the money to keep you (often, they do not), great! Mazeltov! If it doesn’t come to pass, no harm-no foul. You made some money, some friends, and gained some new skills.

There are some types of work that must be performed by an employee; however, contract work is NOT a “step-down” from being an employee! In many cases, contract work is more challenging and more lucrative than being an employee, And, if you sell expertise, long-term, you may prefer to work as a contractor.

The only job security is to be employable.

In my book, The Temp Job: A Survival Guide for the Contingent Worker, I stress the importance of not confusing temporary, contract work with being an employee. Although you might feel like your an employee, you are not. When you are a contractor, you don’t have a boss. You have a client, an agent, and a lot of teammates — all of whom need to be managed (by you!.)

If you have a specific expertise, and think you might want to consult, I’d recommend working a few contract gigs to see if you can handle managing a client.

Not everyone wants to work full-time for an employer. If you have a special talent, expertise or own special tools, contracting could be the best way for you to make the most money per hour. If you’re young in your career, it can also be a low-risk way to acquire big-buck skills on someone else’s dime. Contractor or employee? There is no right or wrong choice. Only you can determine what is in the best interest of you and your career.

***

My book, The Temp Job: A Survival Guide for the Contingent Worker offers straight-forward, no-nonsense advice to anyone navigating today’s contingent labor market. If you’ve never worked as a contractor or consultant, it’s essential reading.

***

Copyright 2020 Pierce/Wharton Research, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this post shall be reproduced without permission.

You Just Lost Your Job !

So, you just lost your job (seems to be a bit of that going around). If you’re new to unemployment, being without a job is a huge disruption to a well-established routine. And, if you’ve been a bit of work-a-holic, you could easily find yourself struggling to structure your time and set goals. Here’s a few things to do:

Stop Freaking Out

So, you’ve been working at the same place for 10 years, and thought you were like “family.” You can’t believe they let you go when <your nemesis> is still there doing the same lousy work. Losing that job was like losing a piece of yourself – like a death.

Except it’s not a death, it’s a job. You’ll get another one. Enough with the drama!

Don’t wallow in self-pity about how you’ve been wronged. Don’t think the people who were not let go are somehow better than you are. If you survived previous RIFs and downturns and assumed that your survival was because you were superior to those who were let go, I can assure you that your self-assessed superiority is overrated. People are let go (or kept) for all kinds of reasons. Sadly, most have little or nothing to do with their actual skills or competence.

If you’ve been with the same company for some time (10 years or more), and thought you would NEVER lose your job, I’m talking to you: You’re waay overdue for a bit of unemployment. You’re no better, no worse than anyone else. I also want you to think about the times you may have looked down on someone who was unemployed. Set aside your mistaken and misguided notions of people’s intelligence, competency, or worthiness and practice some self-love and self-enlightenment.

It’s okay to spend time grieving, but losing a job is not a death. People get jobs and lose jobs all the time. Why you? Why NOT you? You may have thought you were better – you’re not – you’re just equal.

Put Together a List and Structure Your Time

I cannot stress the importance of keeping a routine. I recommend structuring your tasks into 1-3 hour blocks for morning, afternoon, and evening with higher-energy tasks at the beginning of the day. In this way, you make progress on a variety of things daily. For example, the AM, when it’s cool and I have more energy, I’ll focus on physical tasks (A run with the dog, yard work, home repairs). The afternoon, computer work, job search, phone calls, writing. Evening: No-brainer food prep, house cleaning, shopping.

Looking for a job is going to take time, but it’s not going to take ALL your time, and when you do return to work, you’re going to be focused on your new gig. Don’t waste this opportunity. Knocking out chores, taking on-line classes, actually getting started on that (blog, certification, novel), losing some weight, will make you feel happier, more confident, and more in control of your life.

Stop Worrying

Eckhart Tolle says that worry is “too much future, not enough now,” and I couldn’t agree more.

Knowing that you are doing everything you can (sorry, worry isn’t action), will lessen the amount of worry and increase your level of confidence. People who are resilient focus on what they can do, and they do it. They don’t worry about things they cannot control.

If you’re worried about finding a job, ask yourself if you are DOing everything you can. If you can confidently say, “Yes, I’m doing everything I can,” then stop worrying about finding a job because you will.

Too often I see people substitute worry for action. They’re worried about losing their job, but not willing to look for another one. They’re worried about their relationship, but not willing to talk about it, or leave it. They’re worried about their finances, but not willing to give up cable or swap out of their $400 a month car payment. But, they’re worried….

No one has every solved their financial problems with worry.

Life is filled with limitless possibilities. As we emerge from this Covid crisis, we see a very different world than the one we left behind. You have changed your health and spending habits. Have you change your thinking or are you confusing worry for action? Are you seeing your unemployment as the end of your career, or as an opportunity to move into something different, more meaningful, less stressful, something that allows you to be all of who you are? Work toward the reward; stop worrying about risks.

Take a Contract Gig

I don’t run into too many people these days who have NOT worked as a contractor – especially in tech or healthcare – two of this country’s major industries. Every once in a while, however, I will meet someone who has only worked as a W2 employee (or only one employer), and of course there are still those who feel that working as a contractor is “beneath” them or that contractors as “less than” employees. If I’m talking about you: Time to move your mindset into this century…

In my book, The Temp Job: A Survival Guide for the Contingent Worker, I devote a entire chapter to Misconceptions About Contract Work. One of those misconceptions is that contractors have no job security. If you’re reading this, and you’re unemployed, I think you see that no one has job security. If you have been with the same employer for a long time, you also may see that your years there aren’t particularly helpful when it comes to finding a new job. The truth is that being employ-able is much more important than being employed. It really is the only job security anyone can have.

You never know how long you’ll be employed, but you always know if you’re employ-able.

Working as a contractor is different than being an employee. You have a client, not a boss. The dynamic is different. And there is very likely a beginning-middle-end to your contract. Contract work can be much more challenging and more lucrative than being an employee, and if you’ve been looking to level up in your career, contract work is an ideal way to get the experience you need.

My book, The Temp Job: A Survival Guide for the Contingent Worker offers straight-forward, no-nonsense advice to anyone navigating today’s contingent labor market. If you’ve never worked as a contractor or consultant, it’s essential reading.

Final Thoughts

Anytime you lose your job, even if it’s a job you didn’t particularly like, it’s upsetting. You feel rejected. You miss your former colleagues. If you’ve been an employee for a long time, you’ll feel overwhelmed by just the idea of interviewing, and petrified at the thought of starting all over someplace new. All these emotions are very normal, and I can assure you that they are temporary.

You will find another job, and you will get past this, and it will happen sooner than you think, so make the most of your time now that you have some.

***

Copyright 2020 Pierce/Wharton Research, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this post shall be reproduced without permission. 

How Would YOU Caption This?

This cartoon and it’s original caption, “Describe what you can bring to this company,” has gone viral on Twitter and FB. I’ve collected a few hilarious – and a few very pointed – responses off the various feeds, and I would like to hear….

How would you caption this?

~Well, you are the most qualified, but I’m not sure I want to get a beer with you.

~I don’t disagree with your recommendations, but you need to tone down your presentation. You don’t want to sound bitter.

~We are ready to begin the inquiry into the sexual harassment complaint you filed.

~If you work really, really hard and prove yourself, we might consider hiring you full time.

~I’m not sure that the team will respond to your management style.

~The most important thing is we hire someone who reflects our culture and values.

~I’ll have the turkey wrap, and make sure there’s enough cookies and water for the afternoon.

“~~my life debating Republicans in committee each week.” – AOC

~I’m not sure you have the leadership skills for this job.

~We’re looking for a team player. Are you a team player?

~If all you bring is your gender and skin color, then you aren’t worth very much.”

No More Traffic Stops: Police Reform that Could Change Everything

Let’s start with a universal truth: Every single one of us, young, old, rich, poor, white, non-white, city, suburb, bedroom or rural – every single one of us has had an experience with an asshole cop. Most of use have had several. And, that experience almost always began with a bullshit traffic stop.

We know what a bullshit traffic stop is: Tinted windows, no front plate, “illegal” lane change, failure to signal, speeding with no one around, not coming to a “full” stop (aka: the California Roll), jaywalking. Fix-it tickets: Expired registration, broken headlight. These are known as revenue-raisers. You’re more likely to get one toward the end of the month, or the end of a shift, when cops need to fulfill their quota…oh, I mean their “suggested minimum” for traffic tickets.

We know how this works: He pulls you over. (He’s always alone, and so are you). He won’t tell you why you were pulled over. He demands your license, registration, and then walks around the car looking for stuff that could or might be fine-worthy. If nothing is fine-worthy, he asks if you’ve been drinking or using drugs. When you are offended and alarmed, he pokes you again saying you seem “agitated” are you sure you’re not under the influence? (He still hasn’t told you why you were pulled over.) Here it comes now: Step out of the vehicle….do you mind if I search the car? This will make it easier for you…

Any of this sounding familiar?

The multitude of videos showing police harassing, threatening, and ultimately shooting black men and women too often begins with one thing: They were pulled over by a lone, white male cop for some bullshit traffic stop.

If we truly want to stop police violence, we need to do the following:

Remove Revenue Raising and “Suggested Minimums”

States and other municipalities use traffic fines as revenue for their general fund. Why? Unlike raising taxes, it doesn’t require a public vote or legislative debate. Legislatures can silently increase fines, and increase the suggested minimum number of tickets written. This way of funding our government must end.

Making matters worse, for many smaller, cash-strapped communities, these fines are used to fund the budgets of the police departments who are writing these tickets!! This is why we have money for radar guns, but no funds to process rape kits. Moreover, the whole idea of using civil penalties as a primary revenue source for municipality is problematic. It’s clear that what was intended to be a financial disincentive has now become a mechanism for extortion and abuse.

Governments could easily end traffic tickets as a form of revenue raising.

The mission of cops is to protect and serve. They are also supposed to investigate crime. Setting up speed traps and writing traffic tickets fulfills neither of these goals. Moreover, most cops aren’t all too keen on writing tickets anyway – that’s not why they became a cop. What they do like is that bullshit traffic stops give them a multitude of subjective, yet “legitimate” reasons to detain anyone they want.

Speed Limits and Stop Signs Should be Suggested

This is a long held Libertarian battle cry whose time has finally come. I realize that many find this akin to anarchy. However, I would remind you that most people love their cars (and the people in them), and understand that speed limits and stop signs, and other traffic directions are there for the common good and our safety. I think we also know that people abide – or don’t abide– whether there’s a cop present or not.

While it’s easy to get lost in the legislative details of this one, let’s just say this: We, as a citizenry, don’t care too much about speeding and traffic violations. If we did, we wouldn’t be depending on individuals in cars to randomly enforce those violations. With the prevalence of drones, cameras, GPS, tracking devices, and live-stream video, there’s absolutely zero reason for any human being to have to pull-over another human being to issue a hand-written ticket — a ticket that is based on one individual’s “eye-witness” judgement. Again, a structure designed for extortion and abuse.

Stop Asking People to “Step Out of the Car”

Another commonality of many of these cop killings is the cop insists the driver and passengers “Step out of the car.”

Every cop in America knows that an individual has the right to remain in the vehicle unless you are being arrested. (Which is why he’s insisting that you appear under the influence of drugs. See: Intro paragraph above for shake down details).

Once you step out of your car, you are in the most danger you could possibly be.

Time and time again, we see black men and women politely refusing to leave the vehicle – that is their right! The refusal infuriates the cop/bully, an argument ensues, and the cop shoots you because he “felt” you were being “threatening” to him.

Once you step out of your car, you are in the most danger you could possibly be. You are being threatened and bullied by an angry man with weapons. You are almost always alone. You’re often being kicked, shoved, and yelled at, black men are almost immediately hand cuffed – and for what? An “illegal” lane change? Everything about human nature kicks in now – fight or flight – in both cases, you’re going to get shot.

It’s easier to shoot you when you’re outside the car. Regardless, in the case of Philando Castile he was shot inside his vehicle in front of his girlfriend and child.

Any cop who tells you to get out of your car during a traffic stop should be fired. Not given a warning, or sensitivity training, or administrative leave. Fired. Immediately.

Stop asking to “Search the Vehicle”

This is another no-brainer. Under no circumstances should a traffic stop and vehicle search be part of the same interaction. You need a warrant and that warrant requires a judge to approve that you have probable cause. A traffic stop is not probable cause. Cops need to stop threatening people to “give their permission.”

Always do what the cop says, after all, you’ve got nothing to hide, right? If you have a problem with his actions, you can “hash it out” in court was the sage advice offered by a former NYC cop. This is white people fairly tale bullshit …

Cops plant drugs, cops plant weapons. Cops should not be sniffing around your car without a warrant. It’s proven bad for your health.

Any cop who is insisting that you permit him to search your vehicle and/or threatens to arrest you or tow your vehicle because you refused to let him search your car during a traffic stop should be fired. Not given a warning, or sensitivity training, or administrative leave. Fired. Immediately.

Who are you? Why did you stop me?

This is another no-brainer change in protocol. The first thing a cop should do is hand the driver a card with his ID and contact info, and then tell the driver exactly why he has detained him. I should not have to provide my “papers.” This isn’t Nazi Germany. I have the right of free movement. If you’ve stopped me, you must tell me why, and you must tell me immediately.

Any cop who is insisting that you provide him identification before he tells you why you are being detained, or any cop who refuses to provide you the reason why you a being being detained (after you’ve asked, repeatedly) should be fired. Not given a warning, or sensitivity training, or administrative leave. Fired. Immediately.

Protect and Serve or Hassle and Fine?

Dallas Police Chief, David Brown, has it right: We’re asking police to do too much. They are forced to deal with homelessness, mental illness, drug problems, fucked-up relationships. These are serious social issues that demand our attention, but they are not criminal behavior. Broken tail lights, expired registration, tinted windows? These are civil statues, not criminal behavior. Why are the police involved at all?

We need to separate the enforcement of civil penalties from the prevention and investigation of criminal behavior

Now is the time. We MUST tightly define and limit the scope of the police. We can do this by removing the revenue incentive that is insidiously intertwined with traffic “law” enforcement. A rolling stop is not a criminal act. And we also must fire those “Bad Apples” who don’t play by the rules. Laws are for everyone, including the cops.

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Copyright 2020 Pierce/Wharton Research, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this post shall be reproduced without permission.

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